Fat Sex: The Naked Truth by Rebecca Jane Weinstein

Fat SexThis book had a lot of wasted potential. It definitely wasn’t the book I thought it would be.

Judging by the title, one might think this is some kind of lascivious indulgence, or possibly an expose of sorts. Neither is accurate. The book is introduced as a collection of vignettes of fat people who have come to accept their sexuality, and indeed have much satisfying sex.

In truth this book is little more than a platform for the author’s social crusade on fat justice. She obviously feels wronged by the world, and interposes with her commentary on the plight of fat people in modern society. Unfortunately, she interrupts the fascinating stories she presents in order to advance her cause.

If the book had an introductory chapter or two, and/or concluding chapters on the very real social issues fat people face in modern society, I would forgive the author. As is, I feel cheated out of a better book – the book that was actually advertised, you know, about fat sex. Perhaps I wouldn’t feel so bitter if the title were changed, or just different. This book is not the naked truth about fat sex.

While reading the individuals’ stories, I got the impression that Weinstein hadn’t actually interviewed these people. It seemed like she had limited material to work with, almost as if she asked for stories to be submitted online or via email, and she just used what she could and extrapolated the rest of their stories.

Weinstein’s voice and opinions were distracting from the stories themselves. And some of those opinions were just insulting. She compared all “fat admirers” (her term for regular sized people who prefer fat sexual partners) to closeted gay people. She obviously took this opinion from one of her vignettes. One individual did compare his experience with that of closeted gay people. However, Weinstein strings out the references and connotations a little too far. She uses this comparison in all case studies of fat admirers. It felt forced in some instances.

Honestly, I started to yell at the book as I do the news on television. The news will often start a story, cut to an interview, and then halfway through cut to commentary before finishing the interview. This is infuriating to me. Why not just finish the interview? You can give all the commentary you want afterward. Grr! This same thing happened in the book. She’d start with a story, and just when it would start to get interesting she’d cut in with her social justice parade. It was sometimes relevant. Big emphasis on the sometimes. There were such long, unrelated diatribes that I sometimes even forgot the details of the person’s story. Weinstein lost my interest so thoroughly that I forgot what we were talking about in the first place.

I wouldn’t recommend this book to anyone. It’s poorly written, and in need of some serious editing. There are typos and grammatical errors throughout the book. How do books run through so many editing phases without these simple things getting caught and fixed before printing? There are much better written books on the social injustices of fat people. Health at Every Size is one of them. Read that book instead.

Do I Need to Own this Book?

What kind of silly question is that?! Of course I need to own this book. I need to own all the books! Even if I never read the book again, I need to possess it. It will help build my personal library, and it will make me feel giddy when walking into said library and ogling the full shelves.

I love books. I love being surrounded by books. I love recommending and then lending these books. So yeah, I need to own the book.

I still ask myself this question every time I make a book purchase. I’m trying to be budget conscious, you see. I’ve always had a line item in my budget for book buying. Now, it’s relegated to the Extras section of my budget. My larger personal goal of paying off all debt as fast as possible is really taking a toll on my primal need of library building.

Don’t laugh; it’s definitely a primal need. It’s right next to food and shelter on Maslow’s hierarchy. Oh, you missed that notation? Silly you… *shakes head* 

I’ve managed to still purchase books and be budget conscious. Hooray! The thrift store is a magical place in which people abandon lovely books, and I get to scoop them up for next to nothing. Take that budget monster! And, if I call it bibliotherapy to purchase a stack of hardbacks and then systematically devour work my way through them then it certainly speaks to the fact that I needed them, right? Of course it does. *nods*

It seems to be sixes on whether or not it’s cheaper to buy online or at the thrift store/used bookstore. The listed price of used books online is sometimes next to nothing, but it’s the shipping that kills me. And, unless you’re buying all of your selections from the same reseller, then you’re stuck paying for shipping on each book. Grr to hidden costs.

I feel as though I’m becoming a bit of a snob on my used book selections. I definitely prefer hardbound to paperback. I’ll settle for paperback if I’m buying new, since it’s considerably cheaper. See? Budget conscious… *pats back* But I won’t totally snub a used paperback if I really want to read it, it’s a really good deal, and it’s the only option available.

I suppose that goes back to my library building. I’m not ashamed of my paperback shelves. I even have a few complete shelves of mass market paperbacks in my personal library. They still make me smile and add to the giddiness upon crossing the threshold to said library.

So, do I really need that book? You betcha! 

Don’t mind me… I’ll just be over here devouring my newly acquired assets. Om nom nom, tasty morsels!